Online Worship

Welcome to the online service of worship for the First Sunday of Ephiphany  The YouTube playlist may be found here or view below.

 

MAYFIELD SALISBURY PARISH CHURCH
EDINBURGH

Sunday Services of Public Worship
Online from 8.00am (onwards) Every Sunday

 

Sunday 10 January 2021

  

First Sunday of Epiphany
Baptism of the Lord
 

Worship the Lord in the beauty of holiness;
bow down before him, his glory proclaim;
with gold of obedience, and incense of lowliness
bring, and adore him: the Lord is his Name!

Low at his feet lay thy burden of carefulness;
high on his heart he will bear it for thee,
comfort thy sorrows, and answer thy prayerfulness,
guiding thy steps as may best for thee be.

Fear not to enter his courts, in the slenderness
of the poor wealth thou wouldst reckon as thine;
truth in its beauty, and love in its tenderness,
these are the offerings to lay on his shrine.

These, though we bring them in trembling and fearfulness,
he will accept for the Name that is dear,
mornings of joy give for evenings of tearfulness,
trust for our trembling and hope for our fear.

John Samuel Bewley Monsell (1811 – 1875)

 

 

AS A DIVERSE PEOPLE, THE CHURCH GATHERS TO WORSHIP ALMIGHTY GOD

 

 

Notice and Welcome 
Charles Garland and Revd Helen Alexander

CHARLES GARLAND - NOTICE OF INDUCTION
Notice is hereby given that the Presbytery of Edinburgh has received a Call from this congregation of Mayfield Salisbury addressed to the Revd Dr Alexander Forsyth, to be the new minister of this church and parish. This Call has been sustained as a regular Call, and has been accepted by him. The Presbytery, having judged the said Dr Forsyth qualified for the ministry of the Gospel and for this charge, has resolved to proceed to his induction on Sunday 17th day of January 2021 at 4pm on Zoom.

Notice is given that if any member of this congregation of Mayfield Salisbury, has objection to the life or doctrine of the said Dr Forsyth you should intimate your objection at the earliest opportunity to the Presbytery Clerk. If you do this, you will also need to submit to the Presbytery Clerk appropriate evidence to substantiate your objection.

The Presbytery is to meet at 3.50pm on 17th January 2021 on Zoom. If an objection is not notified in advance but is first brought at that meeting the objector must satisfy the Presbytery that there was no earlier opportunity to bring the objection to the attention of the Presbytery Clerk. Unless a substantiated objection is made which is then upheld, the Presbytery shall proceed to the induction of the said Revd Dr Alexander Forsyth without further delay.

By order of the Presbytery of Edinburgh, Revd Marjory McPherson, Presbytery Clerk.

REVD HELEN ALEXANDER - I add to the Session Clerk’s welcome my own to the members and friends of the congregation of Mayfield Salisbury Parish Church and to others who may be joining in our worship online for the First Sunday of Epiphany.

Epiphany means the appearance or manifestation of Jesus Christ. The Season of Epiphany began last Wednesday, 6th January when the church in the West commemorated the revelation of Christ to the Gentile world, symbolised by the worship of the infant Jesus by wise men from the East, while the Eastern Orthodox churches celebrated the Baptism of Christ. The churches in the West traditionally remember Christ’s Baptism on this, the First Sunday of Epiphany. During this service we shall also remember the wise men.

I invite you all to join me now in a short period of silence in preparation for worship.

Silence

Scripture Sentences
Arise shine; for your light has come,
And the glory of the Lord has risen upon you…
Nations shall come to your light,
And kings to the brightness of your dawn.

…when the goodness and loving kindness of our Saviour appeared, he saved us, not because of any works of righteousness that we had done, but according to his mercy, through the water of rebirth and renewal by the Holy Spirit. Today we shall be aided in our prayers by the words of one our great hymns that call to mind the worship of the infant Christ by the Magi from the East.

Let us pray
Worship the Lord in the beauty of holiness;
bow down before him, his glory proclaim;
gold of obedience, and incense of lowliness
bring, and adore him: the Lord is his Name!

Help us, good Lord, as we bend our heads in worship to bend our minds in humility and surrender as we seek the blessing of your loving kindness. Let our prayers rise like incense to your throne of grace, and teach us the proper response to your loving kindness and forgiveness that having received these gifts, we may freely offer them to those with whom we have to do, for the love of Jesus Christ your Son our Lord.

Low at his feet lay thy burden of carefulness;
high on his heart he will bear it for thee,
comfort thy sorrows, and answer thy prayerfulness,
guiding thy steps as may best for thee be.

Speak to our fears, Mother and Father of all, and as a loving parent wipes the tears of a beloved child away, so grant us the comfort of your Holy Spirit. Draw us into your presence. Help us to listen for words of reassurance and patiently to wait for the peace that passes understanding, that we may face the present and the future with confidence and calm.

Fear not to enter his courts, in the slenderness
of the poor wealth thou wouldst reckon as thine;
truth in its beauty, and love in its tenderness,
these are the offerings to lay on his shrine.

Help us, Almighty God, to turn the poverty of our faith into the wealth of open hearted trust. Confirm in us belief in beauty, dignity and truth and help us by your Spirit to love a little better, a more little freely, especially when our impulse is to turn away in disappointment, bitterness or fear.

These, though we bring them in trembling and fearfulness,
he will accept for the Name that is dear,
mornings of joy give for evenings of tearfulness,
trust for our trembling and hope for our fear.

Help us, good Lord, to have faith in the morning even in the darkness of night. And as a child is given a light to fall asleep by, shed the beam of your presence upon us and bid our trembling cease, to the glory of your holy name.

Collect for the Day
Eternal Father by whose revelation your Son Jesus Christ was baptised in the River Jordan and anointed with the Holy Spirit, keep all who are born of water and the Spirit faithful to their calling as your people; through the same Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever.

 

Children’s Address  Hillary Leslie

Good morning everyone! I hope you have all had a good week and are continuing to enjoy your break from school.

Does anyone remember their baptism, or do you remember ever seeing someone get baptised in church? Many of us in our church might have been baptised as babies, so we might not remember our own, but maybe we have watched someone else get baptised in church. Can you think of what happens during a baptism?

This morning in our Bible reading from St Mark, we celebrate Jesus’ baptism. When Jesus was a young man and about to begin his ministry, he went to the River Jordan and his friend John baptised him in the river. Our story tells us that as Jesus came up from under the water, the Holy Spirit came down like a dove from the sky and the voice of God said to him, ‘You are my Son, the Beloved; with you I am well pleased.” Isn’t that a beautiful blessing? God tells Jesus, his son, that he loves him. God is happy with Jesus even before he starts his work and begins his ministry in the world.

Baptism is the moment when we are claimed as a member of the whole church family, when we know that we belong and that we are loved. And we, like Jesus, are given this blessing before we do anything; God loves us from the very beginning!

We are now in the start of a new year, 2021, and it’s common for people to think about the new year as a fresh start, or a new beginning. We might set goals for ourselves to reach during the year, we might be trying something new for the first time, or we might be changing something about our usual routine and experiencing a new beginning either at home or school. We might be excited, but we might also be really nervous, especially if the change is unexpected. Sometimes it’s hard to take the first step when doing something new and different. But we know that God loves us from the very beginning, before we start anything, and that God will continue to love us through all that we experience when we start something new: the nervous parts, the exciting parts, the sad parts and the happy parts.

As we start out in this new year together, may we be reminded of Jesus’ baptism, and that with God’s love and blessings, we can confidently take the first step in our many new beginnings this year, knowing that God will be with us each step of the way, loving us unconditionally.

Now we will have our repeated prayer. Let’s pray:

Dear God,
Thank you for new beginnings,
And for loving us from the start.
Be with us during this new year,
As we experience changes.
Please be with those who need a friend today,
And remind them that they are loved.
Amen.

 

HYMN 180   Give thanks with a grateful heart

Give thanks with a grateful heart,
give thanks to the Holy One,
give thanks because he's given
Jesus Christ, his Son.
Give thanks with a grateful heart,
give thanks to the Holy One,
give thanks because he's given
Jesus Christ, his Son.

And now let the weak say, 'I am strong!'
Let the poor say, 'I am rich
because of what the Lord has done for us!'
And now let the weak say, 'I am strong!'
Let the poor say, 'I am rich
because of what the Lord has done for us!'

Give thanks with a grateful heart,
give thanks to the Holy One,
give thanks because he's given
Jesus Christ, his Son.
Give thanks with a grateful heart,
give thanks to the Holy One,
give thanks because he's given
Jesus Christ, his Son.

Coda: Give thanks.

Sung and played by the Mayfield Salisbury Parish Church Youth
Henry Smith (b.1952)
Words and Music: (c) 1978 Integrity's Hosanna! Music, Sovereign Music UK

 

 

WE LISTEN FOR THE SPIRIT OF GOD IN SCRIPTURE

 

 

Reading   Genesis 1: 1 - 5   
NRSVA
   Wendy Mathison

 

Reflection    Revd Helen Alexander

One of the most striking symbols of Epiphany, certainly for the Western churches is the star of Bethlehem that according to St Matthew led the wise men from the East to the infant Christ. People have long asked if a bright celestial event like the passage of a comet or a planetary conjunction might have inspired Matthew to adopt it for his story. We’ve no way of knowing this for sure. We did have a bright object in our own 21st Century skies last month on December 21st when the conjunction of the planets Jupiter and Saturn, in their closest alignment since 1226, shone upon us as if one bright star. Perhaps this “Once-in-10-Lifetimes Christmas Star” as one writer called it kindled a sense of wonder and hope for people whether or not they professed Christian allegiance, especially when the “hopes and fears of all the years” of Christmas carol fame might otherwise have suggested fear over hope in our coronavirus-ridden times.

Light has always been a great Christian symbol and Christ himself is known by the faithful as The Light of the World. Light is important to all the great religious traditions of the world: Diwali, the great Hindu Festival of Lights, the Light Offerings of Buddhism, the Menorah of Judaism, the Muslim Lamp of Light.  The Scriptures of the Old and New Testaments are filled with references to light: From the beginning: God said, ‘let there be light’; and there was light (1) ….O send thy light forth and thy truth, let them be guides to me (2) …..the people that walked in darkness have seen a great light (3) ….there was a man sent from God whose name was John…He himself was not the light, but he came to testify to the light. The true light, which enlightens everyone was coming into the world (4) ….For it is the God who said, ‘Let light shine out of the darkness’ who has shone in our hearts to give the light of the knowledge of the glory of God in the face of Jesus Christ (5) ..God is light…..If we walk in the light as he himself is in the light, we have fellowship with one another…” (6)

There’s a lot more where that came from. The great invitation is to see the light in whatever form it comes to us, to open ourselves to it, and to offer such light as we’ve been given as a help and solace to one another. We may think that our own light is but a flicker compared to others’ and even in danger of going out altogether, forgetting perhaps that in a dark room even a tiny candle burning low can illuminate the space around it.  We should never underestimate the importance of the candle light that might accompany our reflection, our reading, our prayer; our delight in music and art, themselves all potentially sources of light for our spirits, as well as the light offered to a passer-by from a candle in the window; and the light of presence, especially in these trying times, in a message, a phone call, a smile, a parcel on a doorstep, the raising of a hand in the street, courtesy on a walk, or the keeping of a proper distance in the aisles of a supermarket. You could say that more light may be welcome than ever at a time of coronavirus and that every tiny smidgeon of it has the capacity to penetrate and soften the darkness of grief and uncertainty, ignorance and fear. And now there is the bright star of the vaccine for which we have waited so long.

When we turn to St Mark’s account of the Baptism of Christ that is our Gospel today we find yet more rich symbolism for Epiphany: the waters of the River Jordan, the tearing of the skies, the descent of the Spirit like a dove and the voice from heaven that addresses Jesus as he emerges from the water: “you are my beloved Son.”

Clearly this was a central story for the early church, told by Matthew, Mark and Luke and alluded to by St John. The aspect that is highlighted for us today in alignment with the reading from Genesis is the activity of the wind or Spirit of God that swept over the water in the act of creation. Wind and spirit are translations of the same Hebrew word ‘ruah’. While there’s no mention of a bird at this point in Genesis – that came later – the Hebrew implies the idea of the Spirit’s hovering like a bird. Additionally, to the ancients, water meant chaos, a word that could also be applied to the ‘formless void.’ And so the point of the beginning of Genesis is that out of formless and watery primeval chaos, the creative Spirit of God drew forth the good order and rich potential of the world. 

This link with the symbolism of the Baptism of Christ is not hard to see. Out of the turbulent water of the Jordan rose the Spirit-filled Christ, the beloved of God:  a new creation from the remnant of the old in which – or more precisely in whom - all people might themselves be recreated through the rite of their baptism. As St Paul wrote to the Corinthians: “For just as the body is one and has many members, and all the members of the body, though many, are one body, so it is with Christ. For in the one Spirit we were all baptized into one body – Jews or Greeks, slaves or free – and we were all made to drink of the one Spirit.” (7)

Not that the world changed completely with the baptism of Christ and that of his early followers.  The New Testament roundly confirms that for all the goodness of recreated humanity in Christ, the testing, dangerous and oft-times chaotic world went on, as it has ever since. 

In our own 21st Century times this has come straight to our door as the horror and death of the current pandemic haunts our common life and threatens to tip hospitals that up to now have been bastions of security and healing into centres of helplessness and disorder. And I’m writing this in the wake of the hitherto unimaginable storming of Capitol Hill in Washington as an unruly mob invaded the seat of what many would call the world’s leading democracy. Order was restored and the election of the President Elect and his Deputy confirmed, thank God, but the currents of vicious and unruly conflict threaten to erupt in the days and weeks to come. 

These days most of us would surely assert that you don’t need to be baptized to bring integrity, truth, wisdom, a sense of sanity and courage to dangerous and chaotic circumstances. But those of us who are baptized are just as surely called to cultivate these qualities and to hold them precious, to teach them to our children and to support their growth in our communities with all our mind and strength. 

We are called not to flee from chaos of the world and of our own souls, but to face it fair and square within and without.

We are called to keep faith with reality, fair or foul, and this entails facing reality with faith: faith in goodness and in God and his Christ; faith in the strength of the church and all communities of honourable belief; faith in integrity and truth; faith that the destructiveness that haunts the human psyche can be met with courage and the energy for creative change; faith in generosity and service as well as willingness to stand and to be counted in the face of ignorance and brutality and all that is death-dealing in our world. We are called to keep faith with the light that shines in darkness that the darkness does not overcome.

  1. Genesis1: 3
  2. Metrical Psalm 43: 3a
  3. Isaiah 9: 2
  4. John 1: 6, 8-9
  5. 2 Corinthians 4: 6
  6. 1 John 1: 5b,7a
  7. 1 Corinthians 12: 12-13

 

RESPONSE TO THE SPIRIT OF GOD WITHIN

 

  

Anthem  Three Kings

Three Kings from Persian lands afar
To Jordan follow the pointing star:
And this the quest of the travellers three,
Where the new-born King of the Jews may be.
Full royal gifts they bear for the King;
Gold, incense, myrrh are their offering.

The star shines out with a steadfast ray;
The kings to Bethlehem make their way,
And there in worship they bend the knee,
As Mary’s child in her lap they see;
Their royal gifts they show to the King;
Gold, incense, myrrh are their offering.

Thou child of man, lo, to Bethlehem
The Kings are travelling, travel with them!
The star of mercy, the star of grace,
Shall lead thy heart to its resting place.
Gold, incense, myrrh thou canst not bring;
Offer thy heart to the infant King.

Words and music by Peter Cornelius (1824-1874),
Translated by Herbert Newell Bate (1871-1941)
Baritone, Nick Springthorpe
Piano, Kate Pearson

 

 

Prayers   Revd Helen Alexander

At a time of beginnings: of a new year and of this Season of Epiphany, let us give thanks for all goodness and grace that shines through the darkness: the gift of life itself; the arrival of the vaccine of deliverance and hope; opportunities for worship and service even in times of great anxiety and pain; the encouragement of friends and those we love; glimpses of the extraordinary in the midst of the familiar; hints of hope and quiet, steady faithfulness and courage in the midst of all that would seem to overwhelm us.

Let our prayers rise to God for a world in disarray:
Lands where disease ravages populations already traumatized by hostility and war;
Countries once prosperous and stable, now reeling from the shock of yet more economic anxiety, disease and untimely death;
People who are displaced, confused, despairing and bereft;
People who are ill, frightened that they may be facing death; those who watch and wait with them, and those who struggle to look after them in hospitals and care homes or in ambulances or on the street.

Let our prayers rise to God for the people of the United States of America in all their disunity, inequality and division: the President and President Elect, party leaders and activists, and ordinary citizens up and down that vast land as preparations for the transition of power reach their conclusion.

Let our prayers rise to God for our European neighbours and their own divisions and fears.
And let our prayers rise to God for this nation, itself divided as we face the future, grappling with the challenges of our departure from Europe amidst the horror of a pandemic that knows no boundaries and is indifferent to situation and circumstance.

Let our prayers rise to God for our leaders, and for all here and across the world who work to bring healing and help, stability and calm, ingenuity and skill and ordinary decency and care despite untold risks to themselves.

And let our prayers rise to God for all communities of faith throughout the world; for the church of Jesus Christ a home and abroad, remembering this congregation of Mayfield Salisbury preparing to welcome its Minister Elect in the strangest of circumstances. Let our prayer be for him and his family and for all who will work with him for the good of the church and parish and the city of Edinburgh.

Let our prayers rise to God for those dear to us; for those from whom we may be separated by the distance of miles or misunderstanding; for people we know who may be ill or dying, anxious or afraid; for those who worry us and those who delight and care for us, and all without whom our lives would be so much the poorer.

And let our prayers rise in thanksgiving for all whom we have surrendered to God’s loving embrace; those who are held in the unity of the Communion of Saints with us and all who have gone before us and those who will come after, within the Trinity of grace, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, world without end.

The Lord’s Prayer
Our Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be thy name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done, on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread. And forgive us our debts, as we forgive our debtors. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. For thine is the kingdom, and the power, and the glory, for ever. Amen.

 

Hymn 324    Angels from the realms of glory

Angels from the realms of glory,
wing your flight o'er all the earth;
ye who sang creation's story
now proclaim Messiah's birth:

 Come and worship
 Christ, the new-born King.
 Come and worship,
 worship Christ, the new-born King.

Shepherds in the fields abiding,
watching o'er your flocks by night,
God with us is now residing,
yonder shines the infant Light:

Wise men, leave your contemplations;
brighter visions beam afar;
seek the great Desire of nations;
ye have seen his natal star:

Though an infant now we view him,
he will share his Father's throne,
gather all the nations to him;
every knee shall then bow down:

All creation, join in praising
God the Father, Spirit, Son,
evermore your voices raising
to the eternal Three in One: 

Verses 1, 2, 3 & 5, James Montgomery (1771 - 1854)
Verse 4, unascribed text in The Christmas Box,1825

BENEDICTION  Revd Helen Alexander

Deep peace of the running wave to you
Deep peace of the flowing air to you
Deep peace of the quiet earth to you
Deep peace of the shining stars to you
Deep peace of the Son of peace to you
And the blessing of God: Father, Son and Holy Spirit be with you all.

 

HYMN 825   Amen

Amen! Amen! Amen! Amen! Amen.

 

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INTIMATIONS

 

SERVICE OF INDUCTION  A service of induction for the Revd Dr Sandy Forsyth has been arranged to take place on Sunday 17th January at 4.00pm. Due to the current lockdown restrictions, the service will be online only.   

Futher update on Dr Forsyth’s induction:The service will be hosted entirely on Zoom.  We are asked by Edinburgh Presbytery to register in advance, which can be done by clicking this link HERE.   We appreciate that not everyone will have used Zoom, but perhaps others in your family, or neighbours, have done so.  But if anyone would like any assistance in setting up the link, do let Charles Garland(This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) or William Mearns(This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) know.  If you would like to watch the service, it may be worth signing up now and then you will be ready for this important event a week on Sunday. 

PASTORAL CARE  Happy New Year to you all from the pastoral care team. A new year and new beginnings and if you would like to have a pastoral visitor or be added on to the telephone calls list, then do please contact me. For those of you involved in the various phone chains, thank you, and I would be grateful if you could keep them going during the current lockdown. Please remember to notify me if someone is ill so that the ministry team can respond appropriately. Kay. 07903 266 307

 

 FORTHCOMING SERVICES AT MAYFIELD SALISBURY PARISH CHURCH 

Sunday 17th January Revd Helen Alexander
8.00am onwards Online Worship: Website
8.00am onwards Phone Worship: Dial-a-Sermon
4.00pm Service of Induction: Online 
Note: No Services in the Sanctuary

 


THANK YOU     I should like to record my sincere thanks to the members of the Ministry Team and Anne Mulligan, the choristers, readers and stewards who contributed to the services online and in church throughout the Christmas Season. As my time as locum nears its end I should also like to record my appreciation of everyone whose skill and cooperation has enabled us to offer worship online and in church since the coronavirus struck in the Spring. You are too many to mention here by name but you are very much valued. In particular, the technological wizardly that the Organist Kate Pearson and Stuart Mitchell have brought to bear on their own musical skills and those of the Mayfield Salisbury Chamber Singers and Choir, and the Church Manager William Mearns’ expertise in producing the finished Order of Service week by week have been nothing short of amazing. I’m sure I speak for the whole congregation and many others who have joined in the worship over past months in thanking them all very sincerely. I know you aren’t finished yet! – and I also know you go on with much confidence and goodwill. Helen Alexander

 

MIDWEEK PEACE AND PRAYERS Midweek peace and prayers will not take place until further notice.

OFFERING  The Church is very grateful to all those who continue to support it through their regular and one-off donations, now possible through standing order or the ‘give.net’ facility on the website give.net/20311853 So many members have kindly changed from Freewill Offering Envelopes to standing order that envelopes will not be distributed in future. Because of ongoing concerns regarding Covid19 it is not known when open plate offerings will recommence. If you wish to discuss the manner of your future offerings please feel free to contact me using the details shown on the last page of the Grapevine parish magazine.    Hugh Somerville

 

CORNERSTONE BOOKSHOP

If you are looking for a book to help you on your inward journey, expand your knowledge of Christian history, doctrine or the Bible, then visit Cornerstone Bookshop, St John's Terrace, (under St John's Episcopal Church), Princes Street, Edinburgh.   EH2 4BJ www.cornerstonebooks.org.uk

 

Recommended Daily Meditations:  Fr Richard Rohr at www.cac.org      Also, see www.pray-as-you-go.org

Books for the Journey

A Literary Christmas  British Library Publishing 2018 and 
The First Biography of Jesus: Genre and Meaning in Mark’s Gospel by Helen K Bond  WB Eerdmans Publishing 2020

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Forthcoming Deadlines

Order of service for next week: Thursday at 6.00pm.

Next Grapevine: Friday 29 January 2021 at 6.00pm.

Please send submissions to the Church Manager, William Mearns.

Phone: 0780 801 1234 or email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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Copyright Notices

SCRIPTURE QUOTATIONS are from New Revised Standard Version Bible: Anglicized Edition, copyright © 1989, 1995 National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission.

All rights reserved worldwide.

Mayfield Salisbury Parish Church holds a CCLI Streaming License: #88916

Images – Some courtesy of Pixabay

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 Social Media

www.facebook.com/MayfieldSalisbury

www.youtube.com/user/MayfieldSalisbChurch

www.flickr.com/photos/98063709@N06/

Youth Instagram: the.msyg

 www.mayfieldsalisbury.org

Scottish Charity Number SC000785

      

Service of Induction for the
Revd Dr Sandy Forsyth

IMG 1880 SMALLer 

A service of induction for the Revd Dr Sandy Forsyth has been arranged to take place on Sunday 17th January at 4.00pm. Due to the current lockdown restrictions, the service will be online only.   

Futher update on Dr Forsyth’s induction:The service will be hosted entirely on Zoom.  We are asked by Edinburgh Presbytery to register in advance, which can be done by clicking this link HERE.   We appreciate that not everyone will have used Zoom, but perhaps others in your family, or neighbours, have done so.  But if anyone would like any assistance in setting up the link, do let Charles Garland (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) or William Mearns (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) know.  If you would like to watch the service, it may be worth signing up now and then you will be ready for this important event a week on Sunday. 

Online Worship

Welcome to the Mayfield Salisbury Parish Church Online Worship page. 

Each week, a service will be available from 8.00am on Sunday morning and will remain online for four weeks in the Service Archive listed below.

Please continue to send intimations to the address below. Do get in touch if you have any questions.

Weekly reflections A candle in the window by Revd Peter Millar are also available HERE.

Past sermons preached at Mayfield Salisbury pre-lockdown are still online and available HERE or from the Mayfield Salisbury Church YouTube page HERE.

William Mearns
Church Manager

0780 801 1234
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Contact Information

Mayfield Salisbury Parish Church,
18 West Mayfield,
Edinburgh,
EH9 1TQ

0131 667 1522 / 0780 801 1234

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
Scottish Charity Number: SC000785

Quotations

  • Because God is both knowable and unknowable the tension of the symbol, the multilayers of the myth and the openness of the poetic are all vital to our desire to celebrate the Mystery to whom we relate and in whom we have our being.
    Mark Oakley

  • You must love him as he is: neither God, nor spirit, nor image; even more, the One without commingling, pure, luminous ...

    Meister Eckhart

  • The purpose of our life is God's glory. However lowly a life is, that is what makes it great.
    Oscar Romero

  • Faith may justify bigotry or fanaticism, as Church history tragically witnesses. It needs a safeguard. If it is not animated as it were by the greatest of the theological virtues (love), faith can become defective.
    Thomas Norris

  • Dry not, dry not, your tears of love eternal! Only to eyes that fail to weep does this world seem so dull and dead. Dry not, dry not, those long, sad tears of love.
    Johann von Goette

  • The post modern paradigm manifests itself as a unity which preserves diversity and diversity which strives after unity.
    David Bosch

  • There is only one assertion that requires no evidence. Children are a sacred trust...Unless we care properly for our children, we shall never build a better world.
    'A Good Childhood’ The Children’s Society

  • These are only hints and guesses, hints followed by guesses; and the rest is prayer.
    'The Dry Salvages' T.S.Eliot

  • According to strict truth, God is incomprehensible, and incapable of being measured.
    Origen

  • Myth is a story about the way things never were, but always are.
    Thomas Mann

  • In the darkness ...The child of your love - and now become as the most hated one - the one You have thrown away as unwanted - unloved ..... The darkness is so dark .... I have no faith.
    Mother Teresa

  • I love the Bible. I owe my faith and my life to the Bible and its liberating message. It is in the Bible that I first met Jesus ... I too am included in God's embrace.
    Gene Robinson

  • It is this great absence that is like a presence, that compels me to address it without hope of a reply ....
    R.S. Thomas

  • Faith is not a proud self-consistent philosophy. It involves maintaining oneself between contradictions that can't be solved by analysis. It is therefore a living response to the grace of God as revealed in fragile lives.
    Mark Oakley

  • Any religion which does not say that God is hidden is not true.
    Blaise Pascal

  • The contemporary Church is losing aspects of its wide and generous memory and therefore condemning itself to become a 'swimming pool Church' - one that has all the noise coming from the shallow end.
    Mark Oakley

  • For all your doctrinal headaches take Paradox.
    Mark Oakley

  • The true vision and the true knowledge of what we seek consists precisely in not seeing, in an awareness that our goal transcends all knowledge and is everywhere cut off from us by the darkness of incomprehensibility.
    St Gregory of Nyssa

  • Death, death be hanged, the Lord has promised me that I shall live. This I believe!
    Martin Luther

  • We feel that even when all possible scientific questions have been answered, the problems of life have not been put to rest.
    Wittgenstein

  • Religion is the flight of the alone to the Alone.
    Plotinus

  • Stupid clergymen appeal quite directly to a Bible passage directly understood ....
    Soren Kirkegaard

  • What is the point of the arts of reading and criticism as long as the ecclesiastical interpretation of the Bible, Protestant as well as Catholic, is cultivated as ever?
    Friedrich Nietzsche

  • A figure like Ecclesiast, rugged and luminous, chants in the dark a text that is the answer, although obscure.
    Wallace Stevens

  • Myth is the poetry of the soul.
    Sara Maitland

  • Our loss of the ability to think mythically, poetically, allegorically, creatively, theologically, and artfully is a greater threat to our religious experience than anything good scientists have to report ...
    Sara Maitland

  • In general, Zen attitude is that words and truth are incompatible, or at least that no words can capture truth.
    Douglas Hofstadter

  • 'God' is a one word poem
    Rowan Williams

  • What is today? Today is eternity.
    Meister Eckhart

  • Apprehend God in all things, for God is in all things.
    Meister Eckhart

  • The most powerful hunger we have, mostly suppressed and misdirected, is the hunger for God.
    Miroslav Volf

  • We frequently judge that things are as we wish them to be, for through personal feeling true perspective is easily lost.
    Thomas a Kempis

  • Faith is the bird that feels the light and sings when the dawn is still dark.
    Rabindranath Tagore

  • God is the beyond in our midst.
    Dietrich Bonhoeffer

  • 'God is not the answer, God is the question.'
    Herbert McCabe